Persian

Rheumatology

Related diseases:

• Rheumatoid Arthritis: Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disorder that can affect more than just your joints. In some people, the condition can damage a wide variety of body systems.

• Systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common type of arthritis in kids and teens. About 10% to 20% of children with JIA have a rare and serious subtype called systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (SJIA)

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General Information

Rheumatology is a subspecialty in internal medicine and pediatrics that deals with the joints, soft tissues, autoimmune diseases and heritable connective tissue disorders. A rheumatologist specializes in the diagnosis, treatment and therapy of the rheumatic diseases. Rheumatic diseases are conditions of inflammation and auto-immunity and there are more than 200 diseases. Rheumatology is also associated with soft tissue diseases.

Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA)

Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disorder that can affect more than just your joints. In some people, the condition can damage a wide variety of body systems, including the skin, eyes, lungs, heart and blood vessels.

An autoimmune disorder, rheumatoid arthritis occurs when your immune system mistakenly attacks your own body's tissues.

The inflammation associated with rheumatoid arthritis is what can damage other parts of the body as well. While new types of medications have improved treatment options dramatically, severe rheumatoid arthritis can still cause physical disabilities.

Systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (SJIA)

Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common type of arthritis in kids and teens. About 10% to 20% of children with JIA have a rare and serious subtype called systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (SJIA). “Systemic” means it may affect not only the joints but other parts of the body, including the liver, lungs and heart. SJIA, sometimes referred to as Still’s disease, can occur any time during childhood, but it most commonly starts at about two years of age. Boys and girls are equally affected. SJIA also differs from other subtypes in that it’s the only one considered an autoinflammatory rather than autoimmune disease. SJIA is more severe and can be more challenging to diagnose and treat than other types of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. It is a lifelong disease for many patients and can continue into adulthood.

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